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Nudity advance acting/modeling career?


Devon

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Devon

I'm definitely a fan of male nudity for actors & models. But I've always wondered how/if nudity advances an acting/modeling career?

I can think of several examples of interviews with guys who said their reason for modeling nude was to advance an acting or modeling career. Other than Ron Jeremy a former Playgirl "guy next door" model who rose to fame as a straight porn actor; I can't think of any other guy who successfully launched a acting/modeling career (not in porn) through nude modeling. So exactly how does nudity promotes a non-porn acting career? Do actors include photos of themselves nude in their portfolios when looking for jobs and/or agents see photos of nude models and suddenly think "this guy looks great naked, let me contact his agent." Also, how does nudity advance a modeling career for clothing when the model isn't wearing anything?

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CUM-HUNGRY

Sylvester Stallone started out in porn and transitioned to stardom. Only other I can recall is nude Arnold Swartenneger started with some nude body building. 

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ss197820

I think it might be helpful to also ask the reverse: do male nudity and fully nude photo layouts IN FACT harm careers for men???

If approximately 10% of the male population is gay or bisexual then I have to assume lots of heterosexual guys out there probably couldn't care less about this issue.

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Kawika
(edited)

This is an interesting topic... it's also a very slippery slope in mainstream Hollywood. I think that nudity  in film has become much more accepted in the last twenty or thirty years. There are exceptions of course but for the most part anyone who works in the pornography industry rarely transitions sucessfully  into mainstreams films.

A couple of people who spring to mind who did some nude modeling and went on to successful acting careers were Burt Lancaster and Yul Brenner and later  Steve Bond and Sam Jones who both got a start in Playgirl and went on to do mainstream films and television. I think we are at a point where  the public accepts nudity more than it did in the 50's & 60's when there was still  a code in Hollywood up to the late 60's of what could be shown in film and on television. While the public may have become more tolerant and accepting of nudity... many advertisers have not and people who have done nude modeling and acting I think still will have a difficult time landing product endorsements with conservative companies. 

All this being said my feelings are that once you reach a certain level in the entertainment industry  like Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sylvester Stallone and Bruce Willis and Richard Gere it has not really hurt them or their careers because of where they are on the Hollywood hierarchy and their film full frontals were brief and done in a good taste. All of this has certainly opened the door for actors like Kyle Mac Lachlan, Peter Gallagher and Patrick Dempsey and David Duchovny and countless others. As a side note... I'm a pro at spotting a body double on film. So some of the people you think might have... actually did not.

I think that European film makers and audiences have paved the way for some of the changes in the US film market and audience acceptance in my opinion... but it's really taken a long time in coming since 1973! 

And no... no one in legitimate theatre or film has nude photos in their portfolio(that I know of)... if there is a nude scene and you agree they simply ask you to drop trou at the audition.

 

DayPlayer73 copy.jpg

Edited by Kawika
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ss197820

For the longest time I have wanted to hear about the personal experiences of male models who have appeared in publications like Men, Playgirl, Torso. Mandate, etc. What were their lives like AFTER their photos were published in those magazines? What fields of employment did they work in following publication? 

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Kawika
6 hours ago, ss197820 said:

For the longest time I have wanted to hear about the personal experiences of male models who have appeared in publications like Men, Playgirl, Torso. Mandate, etc. What were their lives like AFTER their photos were published in those magazines? What fields of employment did they work in following publication? 

I know a couple people who appeared in Playgirl (both aspiring models/actors)... a friend of mine appeared in Men (personal trainer) and I met someone once at a bar who was in Torso (bartender). I don't get the impression it changed their life at all other than the attention the month of the publication.

This was an interesting read...

http://famousmaleexposed.blogspot.com/?zx=a6ae458926094d7d

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Devon
(edited)
2 hours ago, Kawika said:

 

 I don't get the impression it changed their life at all other than the attention the month of the publication.

I think Kawika's comment is spot on. If the goal for guys modeling nude is to seek a career in acting/modeling, they should make the most of their 15 minutes of fame because they are soon forgotten. In an interesting interview with Tim Parise on another blog,  Tim said he did nude modeling to experience something new. However, he discovered the photographers he worked with eventually didn't offer more creative ways to photograph him so he declined modeling nude. He discovered that once he stopped modeling nude the modeling offers dried up. Although, recently Tim changed his mind and is modeling nude again more selectively (much to my delight). 

Although , it may only garner attention for a short period of time the opportunity to be featured nude in a reputable publication by a reputable photographer offers a strong incentive for a model to celebrate and capture his moment of physical beauty. With that said, the model should recognize his responsibility for how his image is represented (defined by the model) and distributed.

 

Edited by Devon
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ss197820
5 hours ago, Kawika said:

I know a couple people who appeared in Playgirl (both aspiring models/actors)... a friend of mine appeared in Men (personal trainer) and I met someone once at a bar who was in Torso (bartender). I don't get the impression it changed their life at all other than the attention the month of the publication.

Very interesting. Years back I saw a well-known xxx movie star (active in the late 90s and early 2000s) in person at the gym. He was on the cover of Men and he appeared in Playgirl as well I found out recently. Probably the other magazines that featured male nudity was well. I was too shy to talk to him. It was a bit surreal seeing a man I first saw on the cover of Men.

I did see another Men magazine model at the gym years later (same gym chain, different location) and I saw this guy there a LOT.  Always training and working out. Unlike the previous man, I wasn't attracted to this guy at all. (When I first saw his photos in Men I was like, um, WHY did they pay him to appear in their magazine???) Nobody at the gym appeared to recognize him except for me.

Now with all of the gyms on lockdown I am not seeing ANYONE, pro male model or not. 😞 

I've often wondered if many/most of the guys who posed for Men, Torso, Playgirl etc were personal trainers and fitness industry professionals.

I've often wondered, what did it feel like for these men to receive their copy of the magazine and see themselves fully nude and erect in print? HOW did they end up getting connected to the photographer who photographed them? And what ultimately made them say yes?

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Kawika
14 minutes ago, ss197820 said:

 I've often wondered if many/most of the guys who posed for Men, Torso, Playgirl etc were personal trainers and fitness industry professionals.

I've often wondered, what did it feel like for these men to receive their copy of the magazine and see themselves fully nude and erect in print? HOW did they end up getting connected to the photographer who photographed them? And what ultimately made them say yes?

I think that most anyone who has modeled nude or otherwise have to be fairly fit but not necessarily industry fitness professionals... as for the reasons how people feel and why they do I think will  vary from person to person. My friend who appeared in Advocate Men was approached on Fire Island by photographer Tom Bianchi and appeared in one of his coffee table books and that subsequently got the attention of the photographer from Advocate Men and his reason was ... he thought it would be fun. I was with him when he was approached by Tom Bianchi and I said no for the same reason I said no to someone who approached me at the gym who said he contributed to Playgirl (I found out he actually was a photographer that contributed)...and my reason is/was simple at the time. I was doing work for Coca Cola and Polaroid and work of this nature was and I think still is strictly prohibited in a contract clause. I am currently not under contract to anyone... so would I do it now... I don't know... maybe. It would depend on how I felt about the photographer and what the project is...  I'm currently in two out of print coffee table photography books with no frontal nudity and at the time it ruffled the feathers of the people at Coke, Polaroid and by the nice people who used to  make Arrid Extra Dry anti-perspirant.... all I do now is back up vocal work and I don't think anyone cares one way or the other. It's been a while since anyone has offered... so I think that ship has sailed.

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ss197820

I can imagine Tom Bianchi has a few AWKWARD stories about asking men he's met to completely disrobe in front of the camera! 🙂 

Very sorry you had to say no because of contracts with Coca-Cola and Polaroid. Just shows how hostile American attitudes towards full frontal male nudity have been over the years. The question is, would Coca-Cola impose the same restrictions on female models approached by Playboy? If they did not then that would be a total double standard.

America has long had an extremely neurotic relationship with the nude male body especially with an erection visible.

Magazines like Men, Torso and Mandate got hit hard (not hard in the way we like to see it) following the economic collapse of 2007. I really wonder if some of them could have been saved, possibly by remarketing techniques. Just like many gay bars and clubs, it sure seems like the internet actually HURT these magazines' business, did not help it.

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Kawika
(edited)
1 hour ago, ss197820 said:

I can imagine Tom Bianchi has a few AWKWARD stories about asking men he's met to completely disrobe in front of the camera! 🙂 

 

Not awkward at all with us... we met him on a nude beach!  

As for Coca-Cola and all the rest of the people I did television commercials and print ads for in the past...What they paid outweighs whatever restrictions they imposed... and they imposed the same restrictions on woman too. Sometimes it's a bit heavy handed...  I lost some work because of editorial work in Vogue and GQ in the 70's (78 rings a bell) because I did a couple photo spreads for sun screen... both times wearing nothing (but no frontal nudity). That is where I'm saying Americans in particular have become less prudish... both magazines received  complaints from subscribers that they were afraid to keep a copy in a house with children. Nudity has become more accepted if it's not blatant  I think thanks to cable television.... I don't think anyone would blink an eye today... but who knows.

Edited by Kawika
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JackFTwist
4 hours ago, Devon said:

With that said, the model should recognize his responsibility for how his image is represented (defined by the model) and distributed.

And with the advent of the Internet age, controlling how his image is distributed quickly became virtually impossible.  Once an image of a model appears online for whatever purpose, it's subject to being copied and reposted on other sites.   The various social media platforms have multiplied the problem exponentially.  It's essentially standard practice for the model, as well as the photographer in many cases, to post at least some of the images from a photoshoot on their Twitter feeds, Facebook pages, etc., so anyone can copy the images an re-post them on Pinterest boards, Tumblr or other blogs, and community-oriented special interest sites like Adonis Male. 

A relatively unknown and inexperienced model may not have any control over what the photographer does with his images, especially if the photoshoot is for a third-party client, like an advertising agency that required the model to sign a blanket release as a condition for getting the modeling gig.  On the other hand,  top-tier models, like Daniel Rumfelt, Michael Dean, etc., may have enough power to reserve some control over what photographers do with their images through their contract.  In particular, when a model allows a photographer to shoot "discrete nudes," where the model's genitals are hidden by his hand, his thigh, or some prop, the photographer may also shoot much more explicit images while the model was changing poses.  Unless the model, his agency, or the ultimate client has a contract with the photographer that strictly controls any out-takes from the shoot, some of them may eventually make their way into circulation on the Internet.

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ss197820

I very much agree with Kawika that attitudes towards nudity in America have drastically changed. Especially since the 80s.

In a sense, though, nudity has lost some of the same "shock value" it used to have in those days. If you knew a man in the 80s and he was going to take it all off for an adult magazine the general reaction would have been WHOA!!!!!!!!!!!

I remember reading on a message board -- this guy said he was a bookstore manager back in the 90s. I can't remember if the bookstore was Borders or Barnes and Nobles. He said he ordered copies of Advocate Men (later known as Men magazine) every month for the bookstore's magazine stands. He said it sold out EVERY MONTH.

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Steve

From a Washington Post article on Burt Reynolds Cosmopolitan Centerfold Spread.

Burt Reynolds is stretched out on a bearskin rug like it’s a macho man’s chaise longue. He is tanned, mustachioed, and — much like the beast beneath him — very, very hairy. Bulging veins line his arms, one of which is conveniently placed in front of his nether regions. He is smiling easily, like he’s amused by what he’s depriving you of. Between his teeth, a lit cigarillo droops carelessly, not unlike a . . . well, you know.

 He is making history, but you’d never know it from his expression.  The 1972 photo — Cosmopolitan magazine’s first male centerfold — was a radical statement: that women had desires that deserved not just to be acknowledged, but to be catered to. Its publication sparked a sort of revolution in women’s magazines. Looking back after Reynolds’s death, the centerfold has a powerful legacy. It captivated readers, challenged ideas about sexuality and spawned a wave of new publications. But although it launched Reynolds into a higher stratosphere of celebrity, his relationship with the picture was complicated.

 The idea came to Helen Gurley Brown, then editor in chief of Cosmopolitan, one day in the late ’60s while she was washing the dishes. Gurley Brown had helmed the magazine for three years, expanding Cosmo’s circulation by rebranding it as a women’s magazine that wasn’t for mothers and wives, but for single young women. The changes led to criticism about the magazine’s “seemingly obsessive preoccupation with sex,” according to “The Improbable First Century of Cosmopolitan Magazine” by James Landers.

 “Men like to look at our bodies,” Brownwho served as editor in chief for 32 years, said as she explained the centerfold’s origins in a 2012 Salon interview. “We like to look at their bodies, though it’s not as well known.”

 After making a tough pitch to Hearst Magazine executives, many of whom told her she’d gone too far, Gurley Brown approached Burt Reynolds in 1971, during a commercial break while he was standing in for Johnny Carson on an episode of “The Tonight Show” and asked the movie and TV star if he’d be interested in stripping down for Cosmo.

As Reyolds detailed in his memoir, Gurley Brown pitched the centerfold as a milestone in the sexual revolution. She buttered him up, telling him he was “the one man who could pull it off.”  (Reynolds later learned she had gone to Paul Newman first, but he declined.)   Reynolds agreed easily, but not because he saw it as a chance to be a maverick.  “I wish I could say that I wanted to show my support for women’s rights, but I just thought it would be fun,” Reynolds wrote about it later, adding that he might have been more gung-ho because of the cocktails he’d downed in the green room.  On the way to the photo shoot, a nervous Reynolds stopped for a couple quarts of vodka. The freezing studio was “bad for a naked man’s self-esteem,” Reynolds wrote. Fashion photographer Francesco Scavullo — who became famous for celebrity portraits that graced Cosmopolitan’s pages over 30 years — took hundreds of photos, creatively obscuring Reynolds’ genitalia with props and tactful positioning.

The picture that was eventually published in the magazine’s April 1972 issue was chosen by Reynolds himself. The cover bore a bold, teasing banner, according to Landers: “At Last A Male Nude Centerfold — The Naked Truth About Guess Whoo!!”  Inside, it was prefaced by a bold declaration that such a spread — and the acknowledgment of women’s desires — was long overdue.

 “We had the feeling the reason naked women so abound in magazines, while there is such a dearth of nude men, is that, until recently, those in control of publications have been men, who thought only of pleasing their brother men, and neglected the visual appetites of us equally appreciative girls,” the text read.     

 To say the centerfold was popular would be an understatement of near-criminal proportions. It sold out nationwide, with more than 1.5 million total copies flying off the shelves in short order. And while Cosmo had already been pushing boundaries with stories about sex, this cemented its status as a “sex magazine in the public mind,” Landers wrote, metamorphosizing into a completely new kind of women’s magazine — and others followed suit. When Doug Lambert created Playgirl the following year, he cited the Reynolds centefold. “It came to me, that’s what women want,” Lambert said of the spread later. (Lambert’s wife had been telling him this for years, but he hadn’t bought in until the Cosmopolitan centerfold, according to reporting from Esquire.)

 Cosmo’s notoriety led some retailers to keep it behind counters rather than out on the shelves, elevating it even further, Landers wrote. By the early ’80s, it was selling 2.8 million copies a year.

 Reynolds had a similar explosion of popularity. The morning after the magazine came out, a mob of women waited outside his home, clutching magazines in eager hands. Suddenly, boisterous audiences would bring copies for him to autograph after his theater performances. He got lewd fan mail — including a letter from a woman in Nova Scotia containing pubic hair, according to his autobiography. Once, when he checked into a hotel, he discovered himself imprinted on the bedsheets; the manager said he’d bought them at Macy’s, Reynolds wrote.

 “It was a total fiasco,” Reynolds wrote, referring to the photo as one of his biggest mistakes. “I thought people would be able to separate the fun-loving side of me from the serious actor, but I was wrong.”

 During a South By Southwest appearance in 2016, Reynolds said it was “stupid” of him to bare it all for Cosmopolitan and confessed he’d wondered if the picture had robbed him of an Oscar nomination for his breakout film, “Deliverance,” in 1972, according to reporting from Uproxx. After starring in classics like “Smokey and the Bandit,” “Cannonball Run” and “The Longest Yard,” Reynolds eventually earned an Oscar nomination for his supporting role in 1997’s “Boogie Nights.”

Whatever muddled feelings Reynolds might have had about the photo as he aged, its legacy is undeniable. There’s no telling how many eyes gazed upon Reynolds in his buff and easy glory, but the man on the bearskin rug will surely be archived in the American memory for decades to come.       

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JackFTwist
1 hour ago, ss197820 said:

I remember reading on a message board -- this guy said he was a bookstore manager back in the 90s. I can't remember if the bookstore was Borders or Barnes and Nobles. He said he ordered copies of Advocate Men (later known as Men magazine) every month for the bookstore's magazine stands. He said it sold out EVERY MONTH.

My local Borders also used to carry Men Magazine and sell out of it every month in the years around 2010.  When I asked the manager about it, he told me they only ordered 5 copies per month, despite the fact that the store was located in an area with a fairly large Gay population.  But you'd better believe they never ran out of Playgirl or those seedy biker magazines that featured women with humongous breasts!

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ss197820

When I read that about the bookstore manager who intentionally ordered Men for his store's shelves, it kind of struck a nerve in me. It was as if he intuitively knew there were men out there that were secretly longing to look at fully nude men in an erotic, sexualized light. Men deeply closeted but with string internal sexual longings. 

I've said it before, enjoying Men, Torso, Mandate and Playgirl in the privacy of one's home was an EXPERIENCE. Something money just can't buy. An experience of seeing something highly sexual that American society long labeled as OBSCENE.

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ss197820
On 9/2/2020 at 7:14 AM, Kawika said:

I don't get the impression it changed their life at all other than the attention the month of the publication.

I've wondered if in past decades (80s, 90s) if the reason why many men in fashion modeling but also other fields like fitness/gyms, bartending said no to full frontal nude modeling is because they feared they would be excommunicated (for lack of better words), fired, etc. But as you mentioned, their lives didn't appear to be all that different afterwards except for the month of publication.

Do you know of any personal trainers that got blatantly fired from the gym they worked at because it turned out they were in Men or Playgirl?? Do you know of any of these men got fired specifically for doing this kind of modeling?? If so, WHAT line of work were they able to find afterwards to keep themselves financially afloat??

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Guest lev_igor33

I know as a retired educator, if you pose in  a provocative manner (based on community standards) it is automatic termination. This was the case long before the internet. God only knows how they police internet content and social media. 

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chris80

I know that czech pornstar Tommy Hansen was featured on an advertising in German TV for a company that produces dairy products. The company didn't know that it was a pornactor. Of course the press recognized him and it was a kind of scandal over here. The company got quite angry that he wasn't just an acrobat. That was in 2005. For me it doesn't matter if he is doing porn, but seems that other people still associate it with a negativ feeling. For me the company missed a chance to present them as open minded.

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ss197820

But let's just say when a model does nudes for a magazine like Playgirl, does that REALLY look bad in the eyes of future employers???

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majikthis
(edited)
On 9/5/2020 at 2:48 AM, lev_igor33 said:

I know as a retired educator, if you pose in  a provocative manner (based on community standards) it is automatic termination. This was the case long before the internet. God only knows how they police internet content and social media

A positive example from Italy (of all places):

In 2017 an Italian newspaper revealed that Ruggero Freddi , a lecturer (Mathematical Analysis and Clinical Engineering) at the University of Rome used to star in gay porn. At that time he was better know as Carlo Masi, a gay porn star with an exclusive deal at Colt Studios. Freddi's past became public after Italian newspaper La Verità published a still from one of his films on their front cover. That cover sparked a national debate in the country, about whether it's appropriate for a former porn star to teach at a university – especially such a prestigious one.

But the response wasn't only negative. Following the reveal, Freddi appeared all over Italian TV and radio, and in national and international publications – the story reached Vanity Fair and one of the country's largest newspapers, Il Corriere della Sera. He appeared on current affairs programmes and daytime television, which is remarkable in Italy – homosexuality and porn are often still considered taboo in the country.

Freddi used the fact that he was suddenly so in demand with Italian media to speak out publicly on LGBTQ rights – especially marriage equality – as well as the state of Italian politics and the education system. Despite all the attention, his academic work remains his main focus, and after a short break from teaching, he recently returned to work at the university. In an interview Freddi said "I've received a lot of support from my colleagues and my supervisor, too. Mostly, people tell me that they appreciate that I've communicated a positive message throughout all of this."

Carlo Masi

6a0120a5b0a10f970c01a511ca601f970c-400wiCarlo-Masi-Gay-Porn-Star-Colt-Man-Muscle  carlo-masi-gage-weston-luke-garrett-gay-                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

 

 

 

Ruggero Freddi

  6500C1F0-10A4-4AF3-98ED-4B790FC16E07.jpe  99b65a40386a9926a0325126016ab1ef.jpg ruggero-freddi-1280x720.jpg

 

 

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ss197820

In the late 90s -- I think it was the September 1999 issue of Playgirl -- the centerfold was Mike Sodini. As far as I KNOW that was in fact his real name. Sodini was reportedly repped by Click Models. Which is one of the TOP modeling agencies in the world. How could they have NOT known that he was hired by Playgirl????? Or perhaps their office got the Playgirl job FOR him????

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Kawika
50 minutes ago, ss197820 said:

In the late 90s -- I think it was the September 1999 issue of Playgirl -- the centerfold was Mike Sodini. As far as I KNOW that was in fact his real name. Sodini was reportedly repped by Click Models. Which is one of the TOP modeling agencies in the world. How could they have NOT known that he was hired by Playgirl????? Or perhaps their office got the Playgirl job FOR him????

When I was modeling (which was a long time ago) you really did not do anything without involving your agent (agency) and sure that has not changed. I was with Wilhelmina  Men first and then Zoli Men and the major consideration was and still is loosing product endorsements. The one thing I distinctly remember from the time is neither  agency would sign anyone who had done any porn or centerfold work.. Fashion layouts without clothing was another story. That being said usually the people involved in fashion (unless it's a conservative company) could care less then and now if you are dressed or undressed  but there are exceptions... and the bottom line to all this is the bottom line in that most legitimate  models male and female have a very short life-span in the field and have to make everything they do count for the biggest possible payout because not everyone makes a seamless transition to television and film. If I remember correctly Playgirl in the early to mid 70's was paying about $3,000.00 for a centerfold and in those days it was a lot of money especially if you were starting out and needed some cash but it is important to  look at the big picture and in my case making 3K was not worth loosing the prospect what I ended up earring from Coca-Cola which was substantial in comparison.  I knew someone who posed for Playgirl and when the agency found out they called and Playgirl agreed to toss the photos in exchange for returning the money they paid.

I don't know how much  more I could possibly add to this conversation... but I did some nude work for Ken Haak and Victor Skrebneski later in my career and it did not hurt me at all... but I transitioned to music and voice over work.

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