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Tomster

@bakersman94 Thank you. 

I just found this. Some people say they get fresh yeast from bakeries, Polish or Russian stores. 

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Sammy
On 3/2/2019 at 2:18 PM, Tomster said:

Day 2
The following day, "feed it" by discarding half and adding a further 100 g of flour and 100 ml of lukewarm water.

I followed these steps today. A bit weird to throw away half of the mixture just like that. Anything useful one could do with it?

One question: Is it okay to put the new flour and water into the same container and mixing it? Doesn't the mixing destroy the small cultures (or whatever) that started to evolve? 🤔

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Tomster
1 hour ago, Sammy said:

I followed these steps today. A bit weird to throw away half of the mixture just like that. Anything useful one could do with it?

 

On 3/3/2019 at 12:13 PM, Tomster said:

I added the rest as an ingredient to other breads I'd baked until only with yeast. I reduced the amount of flour and water accordingly.

As soon as the starter is "alive and active", you hardly have any leftovers. You can adjust the quantity to your needs. 

I need for two breads 80 g and another 20-25 g to refresh the sourdough starter itself. 40 g Mehl, 40 g water and 20 g "old" sourdough starter would be enough. I make a little bit more to be able to have enough to double the sourdough starter if I have to bake some additional breads.

I spread the remains on baking paper and dry it. Finely ground it can be added to other baked goods - e.g. buns - as flavor.

You could also fill little holes in the wall because it gets stone hard when dry. 

2 hours ago, Sammy said:

One question: Is it okay to put the new flour and water into the same container and mixing it?

Yes, it is. I take a clean jar when I refresh my starter, but just for the sake that I need water at a temperature of 50 °C.

2 hours ago, Sammy said:

Doesn't the mixing destroy the small cultures (or whatever) that started to evolve? 🤔

No, unless you mix it with a blender. This would change the consistency of the rye flour. 

Just stir it with a spoon or fork. It's necessary to get fresh air into the starter. You can do this twice a day. It helps the process. 

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Tomster

I've posted this photo already. 

IMG_20170422_101520.jpg.df6aa733f0fb8946

I thought it's time to share the recipe with you. 

@JackFTwist and a few others will probably laugh.

 

The bread is called Pivný chlieb and is a Slovakian beer bread.

Ingredients:

Polish (pre-dough):

100 g wheat flour type 1050

100 g water (cold) 

0.1 g fresh yeast

 

Main dough:

Poolish

400 g wheat flour type 550

400g wheat flour type 1050 

100 g whole rye flour

520 g pilsner beer 😀

20 g sea salt 

30 g honey

12 g fresh yeast

 

Preparation:

Polish 

Mix the pre-dough ingredients and allow to mature covered for 18-20 hours at room temperature. 

 

Main dough

Knead all dough ingredients 5 minutes at lowest and a further 7 minutes higher speed second to a tight and smooth dough. The dough was well kneaded when the windowpane test succeeds. 

The dough should have a temperature between 22 and 24 °C. 

Let the dough rest for 1 hour at 24 °C. 

Strech and fold the dough once. 

Let the dough rest for 1 hour at 24 °C. 

Cut 8 dough pieces, shape round and arrange in a star shape so that the dough pieces touch each other (as in the photo above) or shape into two loaves. Sprinkle with some whole rye flour. 

Let it rise for 1 hour at 25 °C, covered with a floured linen cloth. 

Cut the middle dough crosswise and the other dough pieces lengthwise.

Bake at 250 °C with steam for 5 minutes, let out the steam and bake at 220 "C for another 30 minutes.

 

Windowpane test

 

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Tomster
On 3/2/2019 at 4:11 PM, Tomster said:

Tommy's Mixed Wheat And Rye Bread

Ingredients:

For the poolish:
65 g whole wheat flour
65 g water (cold)
0.1 g yeast (fresh)

For the sourdough:
195 g whole rye flour
230 g water (50 °C)
40 g Sourdough starter
4 g sea salt

For the main dough:
poolish
sourdough
50 g whole wheat flour
100 g wheat flour type 550
225 g wheat flour type 1050

165 g water (50 °C)

10 g sea salt
3 g yeast (fresh)

Stupid me has forgotten the water in the main dough while posting the recipe.

@JoelR , could you fix this for me, please?

 

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Tomster
1 hour ago, Sammy said:

Then I checked for the bubbles but they are still rather small, so I guess I have to feed it a bit more.

The bubbles are fine. Their size depends on the flour type. Whole grain flour absorbs more water, that's why the bubbles get bigger.

🙂

1 hour ago, Sammy said:

goes into sort of vinegar

That's fine too. It has a smell something in between wine and vinegar. 

 

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Tomster

Well done, Sammy. 

I'm gonna try a new bread recipe tomorrow. It will be made of spelt flour and roasted and cooked oat flakes. 

 

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bakersman94

i can't wait to see how well it turns out for you, Tommy!!! 

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Tomster
18 hours ago, bakersman94 said:

i can't wait to see how well it turns out for you, Tommy!!! 

It's time for the truth. 😄

IMG_20190316_095741.thumb.jpg.ec4fcc87ca68875349b51d0ef9b10266.jpg

IMG_20190316_141837.thumb.jpg.f581ab43b90223c593406e8d23afa943.jpg

IMG_20190316_141837_zoom.thumb.jpg.8d0e2ddf733e559b493d3be635a1a047.jpg

 

Oat flakes - Spelt - Bread

Ingredients:

Soaker / Mash: (I have no idea what it's called in English. It's "Kochstück" in German.)
100 g roasted oat flakes
500 g water
22 g sea salt

Final dough:
Soaker / Mash
650 g spelt flour type 1050
200 g whole rye flour
50 g extra virgin olive oil
200 g water (50 °C / 122 °F)
10 g fresh yeast

 

Preparation:

Soaker / Mash:
Roast the oat flakes lightly in a pan. Mix oat flakes and water and salt and boil it. Remove it from heat and mix for 2 minutes. Let it cool down for 3 - 4 hours or over night at room temperature.

Final dough:
Mix all ingredients at lowest speed or by hand for 5 minutes. The dough should have a temperature of 25 °C / 77 °F.

Let the dough rest for 30 minutes. Stretch and fold. Let it rest again for 30 minutes. Stretch and fold. Let the dough rest for another 60 minutes.

Place the dough on the floured work surface and cut into 2 pieces.

Pre shape carefully and immediately oval oblong and move it seam side down in proofing baskets.

Let it finally proof for 45 minutes at room temperature (~20 °C / 68 ° F)

Bake at 250 °C / 482 °F with steam for 5 minutes, let out the steam, decrease temperature to 220 °C / 428 °F and bake for 40 minutes.

The bread has a nutty taste. It's just delicious.

I should add that I flocked the oat myself and freshly ground the wholemeal rye flour.

 

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bakersman94

hey Tommy, thank you for sharing your wisdom for making bread with us!! i would love to give this one a try, but the best i can do (for other than white flour) is use whole wheat flour, i`d have to use rolled oats, but i can roast them and boil them with the best of you!! LOLOL!! i have no proofing baskets or anything else that even comes close in shape or size, but since it doesn't actually go in the oven with the bread dough, i`ll see if i can find something temporary to use!! i`ll even try to remember to take pics with my phone!! thank you so much for sharing my friend, with love from Wes!!! hugs!!! 

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Tomster
2 hours ago, JoelR said:

If we ever have an AdonisMale house party, we're going to Tommy's house!  

How many guests can I expect?

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Tomster
26 minutes ago, bakersman94 said:

i would love to give this one a try, but the best i can do (for other than white flour) is use whole wheat flour, i`d have to use rolled oats

You could use half whole wheat flour and the other half white flour.

You may need to adjust the amount of water slightly. The dough should have a rather firm (not too firm) consistency.

46 minutes ago, bakersman94 said:

rolled oats

That's the same. I "rolled" mine with my grain flaker. 

My dictionary gave me several equivalents for the same term.

German: Haferflocken 

English: rolled oats, porridge oats, oat flakes, oarmeal

It's sometimes difficult. 

😀

51 minutes ago, bakersman94 said:

i have no proofing baskets or anything else that even comes close in shape or size, but since it doesn't actually go in the oven with the bread dough, i`ll see if i can find something temporary to use!!

You can take a bowl or something like that. Cover it with a floured linen cloth. That's what I did last week. 

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Tomster
25 minutes ago, majikthis said:

"This is my body given for you"

... and then everyone will drink from me.

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bakersman94
4 hours ago, Tomster said:

Bake at 250 °C / 482 °F with steam for 5 minutes, let out the steam, decrease temperature to 220 °C / 428 °F and bake for 40 minutes.

when you say bake it with steam, do you mean put a small pot or steel bowl of boiling water in the oven with the bread, then take it out after 5 minutes?

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Tomster
11 hours ago, bakersman94 said:

when you say bake it with steam, do you mean put a small pot or steel bowl of boiling water in the oven with the bread, then take it out after 5 minutes?

This method is often recommended, but does not work very well. The humidity in the oven will be increased, but the steam is too poor.

The aim is to have as much steam in the oven as possible so that it condenses on the bread or rolls. This improves the oven rise. In addition, you get an optimal crust and crumb.

I've placed a stainless steel container filled with screws at the bottom of the oven. Other people use volcanic rocks instead of screws.

149_2018031250_2014-11-neuerofen.thumb.jpg.7f5e10b2bee1c5657a112a29ce77aa4c.jpg

Everything is preheated to 270 - 300 °C / 518 - 572 °F. When I put my bread in the oven, I put boiling water on the screws (volcanic rocks). The water evaporates in no time and I have the desired steam.

I use a big marinating syringe so I don't burn my fingers. This also has the advantage that I can almost close the oven.

When I open the oven door after 5 minutes, the steam escapes.

The video demonstrates the method.

 

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Tomster

Twenty-five percent Italian blood flows through my veins. 

Therefore I would like to invite the Italian mother of all yeasts to my bakery.

Lievito Madre

Although I am a patient person, I want a quick result this time. It usually takes 25 days to make a Lievito Madre. However, my biological experiment shall only take 5 days.

Lievito Madre belongs to the sour dough family. It is milder in taste, less acidic and the yeasts are more dominant. It can be made from wheat flour or spelt flour.

I decided to take whole wheat flour. Normally I would use type 550 / 630 flour.

Day 1

125 g (whole) wheat flour
50 g water (30 °C / 86 °F)
20 g honey
10 g extra virgin olive oil

First I stirred water, olive oil and honey together. Then I added 100 g flour and mixed everything with a wooden spoon. On the beech wood plate I kneaded the dough further and gradually added the rest of the flour. 

I kneaded the dough until it had an even, firm consistency. I formed a ball and rubbed it with some olive oil.

I put the dough ball into a tall canning jar and put the lid on loosely. 

I placed the jar in my fermenter proofer at 29 °C / 84.2 °F. It remains there for 24 hours.

IMG_20190317_102753.thumb.jpg.2547e45136215fe480cc1491febe09ef.jpg

Edited by Tomster
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R.R.
4 hours ago, Tomster said:

This method is often recommended, but does not work very well. The humidity in the oven will be increased, but the steam is too poor.

The aim is to have as much steam in the oven as possible so that it condenses on the bread or rolls. This improves the oven rise. In addition, you get an optimal crust and crumb.

I've placed a stainless steel container filled with screws at the bottom of the oven. Other people use volcanic rocks instead of screws.

149_2018031250_2014-11-neuerofen.thumb.jpg.7f5e10b2bee1c5657a112a29ce77aa4c.jpg

Everything is preheated to 270 - 300 °C / 518 - 572 °F. When I put my bread in the oven, I put boiling water on the screws (volcanic rocks). The water evaporates in no time and I have the desired steam.

I use a big marinating syringe so I don't burn my fingers. This also has the advantage that I can almost close the oven.

When I open the oven door after 5 minutes, the steam escapes.

For the sauna loving people out there. Have the sauna on 87°C, then  pour water on the rock-filled electric heater, then we feel the  effect of steam! Except that we are not becoming crust or crumbs. (I hope)

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bakersman94
5 hours ago, Tomster said:

Everything is preheated to 270 - 300 °C / 518 - 572 °F. When I put my bread in the oven, I put boiling water on the screws (volcanic rocks). The water evaporates in no time and I have the desired steam.

I use a big marinating syringe so I don't burn my fingers. This also has the advantage that I can almost close the oven.

When I open the oven door after 5 minutes, the steam escapes.

The video demonstrates the method.

thank you for the rely, Tommy!! now i know what you really meant!! with love from Wes!! hugs!!! 

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Tomster
4 hours ago, R.R. said:

For the sauna loving people out there. Have the sauna on 87°C, then  pour water on the rock-filled electric heater, then we feel the  effect of steam! Except that we are not becoming crust or crumbs. (I hope)

I'm one of them and know very well how sweaty buns feel. 

Because of the high temperatures, the muscles in the body relax. At the same time, the hot air in the sauna improves blood circulation to the mucous membranes in the nose, mouth and throat. 

The metabolism is also stimulated, as is the immune system.

We regularly use our own sauna (private saunas are more common in Scandinavian countries than in Germany), but we also regularly use public saunas.

A side note to my 🇺🇸 American friends, the rumors that we are completely naked in the sauna are true. Even in a public mixed sauna we are naked at all. 

Even in a public mixed sauna we are completely naked. The purpose of the towel is to sit on it. 

m1227.gif

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