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Tommy's food and drink corner

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Tomster

In Germany flour is classified by several flour type numbers.

Here is a table with the equivalents for the US and UK.

flour-types.thumb.gif.02fc6eb55fc59c1365b56e572a228770.gif

 

Precision is important in baking. 

My recipes are all accurate to the gram. I even weigh the water.

😄

This is the only way to get good results.

It is especially important when baking bread. The dough consistency changes quickly with +/- 5 grams of water.

However, the amount of water must be readjusted from time to time, as the water absorption depends on the flour. This can vary depending on the mill, year of harvest and warehousing.

My tools:

- fermenting basket
- kitchen scale 
- dough mixer (Kenwood Cooking Chef)
- Brod & Taylor Proofer
- digital kitchen probe thermometer
- Stainless steel container filled with stainless steel screws 

 

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Sammy
6 hours ago, Tomster said:

Where do my groceries come from, how are they produced? How harmful is industrial agriculture with all its insecticides and pesticides?

 I have set myself the goal of reducing my own negative impact on our environment as good as possible. 

I think this is actually a very important and good topic to discuss.

I am also interested in reducing the emissions I create with my behaviour. 

I also try to buy local and good quality products as good as I can but I know there’s much more to do as I am doing at the moment.

Where I grew up, there was a  local (hobby) farmer raising a few own cows and he sold parts of it directly in private. My family usually bought a 1/8 and we shared it between ourselves. The price was unbeatable and you were absolutely sure the animal lived a good live.

When I moved across the country, I lost that opportunity and the locals doing it here sell the meat individually, so a steak is quite pricey to be fair.

 

6 hours ago, Tomster said:

I will share some recipes

I look forward to read the ones you posted so far, but I do not have time for that at this very moment. ☺️

 

Thank you for posting this personal blog, Tomster. 😊

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bakersman94

hey Tommy, i love the idea of what you are doing!! i also love to bake my own bread, but i wouldn't know where to go or where to start to get to your level of expertise!! i tried to follow along as you make your sourdough starter!! what do you do with the half you remove from the sourdough starter before adding more? what is poolish? what is the difference between wild yeast and fresh yeast and why do you use fresh yeast when you prefer to use wild yeast!! what is a fementing basket? all these things are totally new to me!! i know what yeast is, i use the dry active yeast and it works very well for me!!

i tried making sourdough started many years ago, but no matter what i did, or how long i let it sit to ferment, nothing happened at all. i gave the sourdough starter the benefit of the doubt and use some to make sourdough bread!! if you didn`t know i went through all the trouble of making the sourdough, and left it to ferment for days and weeks before using it (i was quite diligent in following the recipe for sourdough), you would never have known there was anything sourdough about the bread at all. after making 3 batches of bread with the sourdough starter, i finally gave up and threw out the sourdough starter that i had wasted time working on for well over 3 weeks into the garbage. nursing it, and fussing with it, so it would turn out just right. i followed every step for making the sourdough very carefully!! thank you for sharing this personal blog with us, i am very interested in learning from you!! with love from Wes!! hugs!!! 

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bakersman94

yes, i did use a glass jar for the sourdough starter, it was a mason jar!! why is the stainless steel container filled with stainless steel screws? 

 

richtig-Schwaden-mit-der-Schraubenmethod

 

when i make bread with dry active yeast, i can have bread on the table 2 hours from the time i start making the bread dough. i made 48 buns for a family members birthday party, and it only took me 31/2 to 4 hours from when i started making the dough, to the time the last of the buns came from the oven. i could half that time if i had 4 cake pans. when i make buns, i make balls with the bread dough, place the first ball in the middle of the pan, then i make balls of equal size and go around the outside of the round cake pan. when they are done baking, you can just tear off the buns one at a time. i have a very simple recipe for this if anyone is interested, and if Tommy doesn`t mind me sharing it here! with love from Wes!! hugs!!! 

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Tomster
32 minutes ago, bakersman94 said:

yes, i did use a glass jar for the sourdough starter, it was a mason jar!!

I asked because a metal bowl or something made of metal does not work. 

My gut tells me it might be the flour.

 

36 minutes ago, bakersman94 said:

why is the stainless steel container filled with stainless steel screws? 

With the screws I have a much larger surface that comes into contact with the water. These are heated to 270 °C. The hot water is immediately transformed into finest steam. With the marinating syringe I can pour the water through the almost closed oven door.

 

46 minutes ago, bakersman94 said:

when i make bread with dry active yeast, i can have bread on the table 2 hours from the time i start making the bread dough.

Yes, this is possible with a high amount of yeast and warm dough proving. That's how I began. 

Today, I prefer the concept of extra long dough proving at colder temperatures for bread baked with yeast exclusively. It's called slow baking. 

I should share a recipe for rustic baguette rolls where the dough matures for 60 hours. (not sure if mature is correct in this context) 

 

1 hour ago, bakersman94 said:

if Tommy doesn`t mind me sharing it here!

Wes, I'd be happy. 

🙂

 

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Tomster
1 hour ago, bakersman94 said:

place the first ball in the middle of the pan, then i make balls of equal size and go around the outside of the round cake pan.

IMG_20170422_101520.thumb.jpg.ab1c7bf193dc2845cee4ca737f83eb18.jpg

 

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Tomster
19 hours ago, Sammy said:

I am also interested in reducing the emissions I create with my behaviour

The good thing about it is that you can start with very simple steps.

It doesn't hurt and it's not a loss of comfort.

How long does it take to take something out of the fridge? 

If you need several things, the refrigerator door can be closed in between. It often happened to us that the door would remain open for minutes while we walked across the kitchen to put the food down.

It's so simple to save some energy. 

😄

What often bothered me was that windows were opened for ventilation but the heating or air conditioning was not reduced.

This happened at home but much more often in my company. It's now automated. Window contacts report to the thermostat whether the window is open or closed.

😊

 

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Tomster
On 3/3/2019 at 2:16 PM, Tomster said:

I should share a recipe for rustic baguette rolls where the dough matures for 60 hours.

Rustic Baguette Rolls

Ingredients:

300 g wheat flour type 550
30 g whole weat flour
30 g rye flour type 1150
230 g water (10 - 12 °C)
3 g yeat (fresh)
7 g sea salt
7 g butter

 

Preparation:

Mix all ingredients by hand (the flour must be well worked in).

Rest for 60 minutes at 24 °C, stretch and fold every 20 minutes. 

Put the dough well covered into the fridge for 48 hours at 4 - 6 °C.

From the cold dough gently cut 6 dough pieces to approx. 100 g and also gently roll up with plenty of flour tapering longish.

Cover and leave the dough pieces to rise for 10 - 12 hours at approx. 6 °C on a well floured baking linen.

Bake directly from the fridge at 250 °C for 15 minutes with steam, with the end facing upwards. If the end does not open properly, tighten with a razor blade before baking.

rust2.thumb.jpg.b3814c2bedb9d2a6a3a5eb12831c309c.jpg

Edited by Tomster
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Tomster

Thank you very much, @R.R.

The orange creme tart looks delicious (even the baker). It took me an hour to watch a 13-minute video. 

😄

Ingredients:

Short pastry:
250 g flour
125 g butter
100 g sugar
1 tbsp milk

Orange creme:
6 egg yolks
160 g powdered sugar
40 g corn starch
500 ml orange juice (approx. 6 oranges)
orange zest
80 g butter

200 g whipping cream (fat rate min. 33 %)

Italian meringue:
4 egg whites (or 125 g)
250 g sugar (cubes)
100 g water

(a hot baker)

 

Preparation:

Shortcrust pastry
Quickly knead the dough ingredients into a shortcrust pastry. Let it rest in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes (preferably overnight). Roll out the dough, place in a baking pan and blind-bake at 180 °C for approx. 15-20 minutes.

Orange creme
Withhold 40 ml of orange juice. 

Beat the egg yolks with the sugar frothy. 

Mix the corn starch with the retained juice well and add to the egg-sugar mixture.

Bring the lemon juice to the boil with the zest. Add the egg-sugar-corn starch mixture and cook for 1-2 minutes while stirring. Remove the cream from the heat and stir in the butter well.

Let the creme to leave to cool down (fridge).

Whisk the whipped cream until stiff. Stir the cold orange creme with the whisk until smooth and fold the whipped cream in. Put the creme on the cold base.

Italian meringue
Beat the egg white until stiff. Meanwhile, bring water and sugar to the boil until the mixture is at exactly 118 °C and and add them to the egg-white in a fine stream.

Actually you can see the whole preparation in the video, if you can focus on it. 

 

17 hours ago, R.R. said:

I do like to cock, but bakery isn't my thing.

I guess it's just a typo. 😉

I'd appreciate it if you'd share some recipes with us.

 

Edited by Tomster
removed 54 oranges
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wolfe

I lived healthier growing up because a lot of things came from local farmers. Today most farms around where I live are being built up.  You can't even find a produce stand anymore.

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Sammy
On 3/2/2019 at 2:18 PM, Tomster said:

I made my sourdough starter years ago. 

I find it amazing how long you’ll stick with such a sourdough starter. 

I’ve heard about it before but never read a detailed description/explanation about it.

Personally, I never really liked the taste of sourdough bread until I tried a local one from a local store. It’s quite pricy but also very nice.

I get complains that I should start/continuing with baking, so I think I’ll have to try to make a sourdough bread myself soon. 🤔

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Sammy
On 3/3/2019 at 12:13 PM, Tomster said:

With regard to the German flour types, everything lower than wheat flour type 1050 and rye flour type 1150 is unsuitable.

So are you saying one does not need to take rye flour for a sourdough starter? 

I always assumed this and never thought there also exist wheat flour sourdough? 🤔

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bakersman94
24 minutes ago, Sammy said:

With regard to the German flour types, everything lower than wheat flour type 1050 and rye flour type 1150 is unsuitable.

 

 

On 3/2/2019 at 9:10 AM, Tomster said:

flour-types.thumb.gif.02fc6eb55fc59c1365b56e572a228770.gif

 

hey Tommy, i`ve never seen flour graded in this manner before. i know of no place in my city that has a flour mill that i could go to, to see if they had their flour is graded in this manner!! i can buy flour and yeast at the grocery store, and my recipe for bread is very good. i don`t know if i have the patience you have for having a bread dough take 60 hours to rise. i mean no offense, i think it is awesome that this method works for you, and seems to work very well too!! i'll be making bread for a dinner on Saturday. i can make 64 buns from 4 batches of bread dough and it will only take me about 3 1/2 to 4 hours from the time i start making the first recipe of bread dough. each batch makes 16 buns. it is way past my bedtime, but tomorrow i'll share my bread recipe. it is a very forgiving recipe, so even if you fuck up here and there, the dough will still turn out well or you, if you should decide to make it!! with love from Wes!! hugs!!! 

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R.R.
On 3/5/2019 at 9:52 PM, R.R. said:

I do like to cock, but bakery isn't my thing.post-5494-1233158813.gif

 

20 hours ago, Tomster said:

I guess it's just a typo. 😉

 

On 3/5/2019 at 9:52 PM, R.R. said:

Hehe sorry Tommy, second time did that, of course no "to" .

thththpeekaboo.gif

 

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Tomster
13 hours ago, wolfe said:

I lived healthier growing up because a lot of things came from local farmers. Today most farms around where I live are being built up.  You can't even find a produce stand anymore.

That's sad. 

There was also this trend in my region, but now the number of direct marketers is increasing. 

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Tomster
9 hours ago, Sammy said:

I find it amazing how long you’ll stick with such a sourdough starter.

The sourdough culture can be kept alive for centuries with proper care.

I found an article about a baker who has a 250 years old sourdough culture. https://www.merkur.de/lokales/garmisch-partenkirchen/landkreis/jahre-alter-sauerteig-14504.html

(The link leads to a German page.) 

Quote

Toni Sand kneads an inconspicuous grey-brown mass, which looks similar to clay or plasticine, very intensively. But what the Partenkirchen master baker lovingly prepares is sourdough, the mother of all rye breads, so to speak, and already 250 years old. "It probably dates back to around 1750," says the baked goods expert. However, the almost ancient sourdough, consisting of spelt, rye and water, serves as the basis for tasty, healthy bread. For the baker it is no problem to draw new sourdough from this original sourdough, the so-called "Anstellgut", with water and rye meal.

But how did the 43 years old come to the 250 years old dough? "Three years ago", he says, "a woman from Berlin also visited the 'bread house' of the bakers at the historical festival of the 700-year-old Partenkirchen market survey. She reported on her family that they had been keeping one and the same sourdough, which they lovingly call 'Gretchen', alive for over 250 years. Especially in bad times, it has always been important for the family, who come from hunters, horse breeders and farmers in Brandenburg, East Prussia and Schleswig-Holstein, to have a natural sourdough as the basis for the basic food bread".

 

9 hours ago, Sammy said:

So are you saying one does not need to take rye flour for a sourdough starter?

Wheat sourdough, spelt sourdough, rye sourdough is just the most common variant. 

I don't want to care for three or more sourdough starters. I just take a little bit of my rye sourdough starter and refresh it a few times with wheat or spelt, if I need those kinds of sourdough. 

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Tomster
9 hours ago, bakersman94 said:

hey Tommy, i`ve never seen flour graded in this manner before. i know of no place in my city that has a flour mill that i could go to, to see if they had their flour is graded in this manner!!

I found the Brant Flour Mills in Oakland, Ontario. http://www.brantflourmills.com/milling-guide

9 hours ago, bakersman94 said:

i don`t know if i have the patience you have for having a bread dough take 60 hours to rise. i mean no offense, i think it is awesome that this method works for you, and seems to work very well too!!

It only needs more planning. The workload is the same. 

There is a study by the University of Hohenheim that shows that prolonging the dough proofing times to more than 4 hours results in more digestible, healthier and more aromatic breads.

My pizza dough rests for at least 5 days in the refrigerator.

But I also bake simple breads and rolls, which are finished after 3 to 4 hours.

With the rustic baguette rolls it is possible for me to have fresh rolls for breakfast shortly after getting up.

😊

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bakersman94

thank you for this info, Tommy!! the only problem is, Oakland Ontario is 45 minutes from Hamilton, and i don't drive!! i don't even have a driver's license!! 

you are far more educated in the making of bread that i ever will be!! there is a lot of info to take in, and it would be even more helpful if it was included in the bread recipes!! all i get are the recipes for making the bread. no other info is ever included. is this info included in the bread recipes from Germany? or do you have to do research on it to learn about it? with love from Wes!! hugs!!! 

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bakersman94

i tried a search for any flour mills in my city of hamilton ontario, there is one https://www.parrishandheimbecker.com/5_911 they request to call ahead, so they can accommodate you, and give you their best service. now that i have found a flour mill, i don`t know what i should do now, LOLOL!! with love from Wes!! hugs!!! 

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